Tag Archives: Mundane

Second Sock Syndrome (Or Do It Again! and again and again)

socksKnitting.  Apparently it’s all the rage.  I didn’t know that when I discovered my new love a little less than four months ago. But honestly I’m grateful that knitting is considered trendy right now since it opens up so many doors for me by way of local yarn shops, publications, websites, inspirations, and co-addicts  fellow knitters.

Four months into this new hobby, I have created approximately 15 scarves, 10 hats, a varied numbers of cowls, headbands, washcloths, and fingerless gloves. Yes, I am even in the process of knitting (gulp) socks.

When a friend told me she knitted her socks, my immediate questions was, “What possesses you?”  I would ogle the socks that adorned her feet, studying the micro stitches and intricate patterns, and a feeling of incapability would immediately wash over me.  Each time this happened, I would quickly dismiss the notion of knitting socks as something only attempted by the most masterful knitter or the criminally insane.  I was neither so I was safe.

It’s never really that easy though, is it?  I wounder if you are much like I am. When faced with something that appears to be essentially impossible, it becomes difficult to dismiss for more than ten minutes at a time.  An inner voice whispers in my ear, softly at first, then louder with the passage of time, like a child whose questions have gone unheard for too long.

“You can do it.” “You CAN do it.” “YOU can DO it!” “YOU CAN DO IT!”

OK.  Admittedly, THAT is about all the motivation that I require to tackle something new.  Understandably, there are things that I cannot do.  A triple twisting back flip off a 4″ ledge comes quickly to mind.  Other than that, I appreciate a challenge and typically work hard to accomplish a new goal.  In cases such as this, motivation runs naturally high for me.

For three weeks now I have knit with needles the size of toothpicks and yarn seemingly no thicker than thread. I have watched the pattern emerge as I repeatedly hold my first sock to my foot and imagine the end product, all while I question the sanity of working so hard at something that will soon be covered up by a boot!

As that first sock nears completion, however, the stark realization sets in. That exact sock needs to be knit again.  This time around will be easier since I have just proven that, in fact, I can knit a sock.  But the motivational level has dropped significantly. This is a project that I have already done. I really want to set my sights on the horizon and select a new project rather than repeating the  exact item I just completed.  In the knitting community, this is known as Second Sock Syndrome and it often strikes both the seasoned and new knitter with a vengeance.

This mirrors life, doesn’t it?  Whether in school, at work, or in the home, there are many tasks that require repetition.  A student will daily board the school bus, arrive at a prescribed time, navigate the halls to attend classes, work complicated math problems and write long papers. At home we never truly finish the laundry, meal prep, or dishes.  And even though the same carpet has been vacuumed thousands of times, it will require it again and again and again.  In the work environment, there will always be meetings to attend, customers to serve, and files to be restored.  Often these tasks will involve the same people on a daily basis.

Conversely, a two year-old will repeatedly squeal with delight, yelling, “More, more!” as you pop your head over the top of his favorite blanket in a jovial game of Peek-A-Boo!  A year later, he will plead with you, “Do it again!” as you twirl him around the backyard, helicopter fashion.  At five years-old, he will be in front of the TV at 11 a.m. to watch SpongeBob and find humor in it – even when he has watched the same episode three times already.

I have no doubt that, at a young age, there is still a freshness to much of life in just the everyday, so unless it involves potty training, self-motivation is extremely accessible.

How often do we squeal with delight, singing out, “Do it again!” as we dislodge the vacuum cleaner from the closet and prepare to vacuum the carpet? Have we ever seen anyone board a school or city bus, smiling and calling out, “More! More!”?  Do we find excitement in running the same backup tapes at work as a myriad of colorful lights flash excitedly before our eyes?

So what motivates you? Since Second Sock Syndrome set in with me, I’ve begun questioning people about their motivation in the everyday.  The answers are always varied. Some are surprising, others are more predictable. Some are internal motivators, others are external motivators. Examples include:

  • the threat of punitive measures if not completed (fear);
  • the desire to please someone else (recognition);
  • the determination to set a good example for others (futurity);
  • the opportunity to grow in both patience and persistence (progress);
  • the hope of learning new information (knowledge acquisition) ; and
  • the start-strong, finish-strong mentality (achievement).

Regardless of the motivation, I find there is always one thing that remains constant.  That constant is an end goal that the person sees and strives to attain.  The student strives for the grade in hopes of a scholarship.  The employee strives to meet or exceed expectations at the end of the day, week, month or year, in anticipation of a salary increase, promotion, or both. The stay-at-home mom strives to create an environment that is both aesthetically pleasing and physically comfortable for her family.

Motivation is really a requirement in goal accomplishment since it usually determines whether or not we will even attempt to achieve our goals. Therefore it becomes important to realize what our motivators are. What do we respond well to? From where do we draw our strength to continue?  Are we able to develop internal motivation or do we depend solely on external motivators? As individuals we all differ in what drives us, yet there is motivation in nearly everything we do.

Today I invite you to consider your motivators. Determine what moves you toward your goals. By knowing and understanding your personal motivators, you create a life line in time of need when you are able to recall WHY you are doing something – especially when it appears mundane.

That Second Sock Syndrome I refer to?  It CAN be beat … I need only put the first sock on my foot to realize how important it is to finish the task!

Philippians 3:13-14

Brothers and sisters, I do not consider myself yet to have taken hold of it. But one thing I do: Forgetting what is behind and straining toward what is ahead, I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus. 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Happy

 

What makes me happy?  Easy …. Family, Friends, Seasons, Signs, and Silliness.

Hello world!

They say third time’s a charm. So here I am again. I’ve previously tried to start and maintain blogs a couple times. With each attempt, I have created and subsequently neglected them, relegating them to the far reaches of cyberspace. I don’t lack for blog-content; that’s not my excuse. I really can’t say I lack for time because … don’t we all? Admittedly, I DO lack for know-how! Growing up, however, my mother’s mantra was always, “You can’t learn any younger!” OK. There’s some wisdom to that. I can do this, right?

Within the entries of this blog, you’ll find my musings on various life events, almost all of which will very likely sound mundane, maybe even insignificant. But as I live each day in the mundane, wiping noses, washing endless piles of laundry, cooking, cleaning, teaching, and transporting, I am beginning to realize just how significant each moment can truly be.

As I look upon these moments through my own eyes, I tend to take them and the associated people, places, and things for granted. They’ve always been there. I assume they always WILL be there. Have you ever noticed that the eyes of a child don’t SEE that way? Things are NEW, moments are GRAND, life is EXCITING! Really, put paper towels and a Windex bottle in the hands of a five year-old and they are more than enthusiastic to wash every window they can both see and reach! And when that same child is given the same mundane task in three months, it will be completed with that same level of zeal! Is it that they are programmed to live well in the moment? To find significance in the mundane?

“Hey, Mommy! Look!! I’m done! What now?” Owen calls over his shoulder to me. What NOW? Can you help me with this blog? =) Stick near me, Son. I’m learning a lot from you!